Category Archives: Adv. Digital FIles

Mobile Device Exercises

Throughout the semester you are to use your camera phone to capture a series of five images based upon the theme for that particular week. After you have captured these images be sure to upload them to your Instagram account using the #advphoto2014 comment so that it can be shared with the class.

http://statigr.am/viewer.php#/tag/advphoto2015/

EXERCISE #1 DUE JANUARY 29th:

FRAMING

Framing refers to the technique of surrounding your main subject (partly or in full) with other compositional elements. Framing helps direct the viewer’s eye to an image’s center of interest. It also helps keep the eye from wandering outside an image’s border. Framing can be obvious or subtle. Some of the best examples of framing are those that are scarcely noticed.

Be careful not to allow an image’s framing elements to overwhelm its main subject. (An obvious exception is when framing elements themselves are meant to be the main subject.)

Framing elements should have contextual, conceptual or aesthetic relevance to the main subject. Use complementary connections to build on a theme; contrasting associations to impart overtones of tension, intrigue or humor.

AND/OR

Open Markets

Photograph any kind of outdoor market, from a large “street market” to a single vendor with a cart.

Goals to consider: Look for photo opportunities among the merchandise itself, and among the people selling it. Try to catch people in relation to merchandise, rather than just a straight portrait of someone who happens to be selling (or buying) something. Look for money or merchandise passing between people.

Tips: Notice the sizes and shapes of various vegetables, fruits or other merchandise, the way they are arranged, the patterns they create. Watch how the vendors interact with their customers. Are they bored? Energetic? Friendly? This is another broad category, so use your imagination. The corner grocer is okay, so is a street vendor, a yard or garage sale, a fish market, a supermarket, anywhere someone is offering a service for sale (a shoeshine stall, for example), a sidewalk art show, a newspaper stand or someone selling souvenir T-shirts from a cart. Once again, remember to ask permission.

EXERCISE #2 DUE FEBRUARY 24th:

REPETITION

Verbally, people sometimes repeat themselves to attract attention, emphasize a point, or to irritate others. Visual repetition can be used to achieve the very same results. Most people take a second look when they come across instances where objects are repeated in an intriguing or unlikely manner.

Thematically speaking, repetition can be incorporated into images to convey qualities of conformity, accord and harmony.

AND/OR

Old Things

Photograph a variety of old objects, things that are worn from age or use-houses, tools, toys, furniture, etc.

Goals to consider: Show how the age of an object influences its character.

Tips: People in our society tend to think that a thing has to be new and glossy to be good. Few people appreciate things that have earned their character through age and lots of use. That’s what this project is about. Look for peeled paint, rust, broken glass, things that have been abandoned, used up, worn out. They have a statement of their own, a special mood. That mood may be sad (“This thing is all worn out”), or happy (“This thing has been useful for years”). Try to capture the object’s character. Notice how light and texture may help to portray that character. Possible subjects include old houses, cars, tools, bridges, train tracks, machinery, abandoned buildings, an old can, discarded toys, a chipped plate, teacup, fork. (Note: If you find something indoors that you want to photograph outdoors, be very careful that it does not look set up. Adjust the arrangement until it looks natural.)

EXERCISE #3 DUE MARCH 16TH:

SHADOW WORLD

Shadows happen all the time, whether it takes place Indoors, outdoors or in-between. But how many of us are really taking note of them- paying attention to the effect shadows have on the objects and scenes around us (as well as the fantastic assortment of shapes and forms of shadows themselves)?

A shadow, of course, provides another way of viewing an image. Like a silhouette, it is a perfect two-dimensional representation of the outline. The size and visibility of the subject’s shadow will depend on the angle of the available light.

AND/OR

Street Cred

The host of visual delights offered by street life make it well worth overcoming any shyness you might have about photographing people in public places. By remaining unobtrusive you can capture enchantingly natural poses, and even if you are spotted, direct confrontation between subject and camera can produce equally striking results. The beauty of camera phones can make it seem like you are texting or just simply holding the phone when you are capturing pictures of people in public places.

EXERCISE #4 DUE APRIL 13th:

ABSTRACTION

Digital photography is an ideal medium for anyone who enjoys creating abstract visuals. Why? Because camera phones provide endless possibilities when it comes to the exploration of viewpoints, shooting variables and compositional options. Plus, digital images can be easily linked to a software environment where further effects can be applied and considered.

Let your personal tastes and ever evolving instincts for composition and aesthetics tell you what makes for a good abstract image. Take a look at other people’s non-realistic photos for inspiration and ideas. Investigate works of abstract painting, sculpture and design

AND/OR

Sign Language

Words can make excellent subject for photos. Words are not only infused with meaning of their own, they can also take on humorous or ironic thematic twists- depending on the context in which they are seen.

Signs speak and their visual voice is not only delivered through letters, numbers, words and symbols- it’s also conveyed through the style, design, colors and condition of the signs themselves.

Given this multi-level delivery of message and aesthetics, signs are especially valuable to photographers- not only as stand-alone subjects, but also for the conceptual and aesthetic boost they can lend to the scenes they inhibit.

EXERCISE #5 DUE MAY 12th:

Elongated Foreground

Do a series of photographs in which the foreground fills the lower 2/ 3 of the frame.

Goals to consider: See what interesting effects you can achieve by intentionally “weighting” a photograph very strongly toward the top. It’s against the rules, but it can produce a great effect.

Tips: To work well, the foreground must be interesting. It may be very plain or highly patterned, but it should draw the viewer in. Bear in mind shadows and texture, reflections, contrasting values, etc. A wide-angle lens is helpful for an assignment like this, but not necessary. If the subject is fairly close to you, try positioning yourself so you can shoot down at it. This will enable you to expand the foreground. If the subject is fairly distant, you can achieve a similar effect by getting down low as well. As always, experiment

AND/OR

Reflections

Reflections can be visually exciting and can be found on a variety of unexpected surfaces. With the sun shining on the subject, glass buildings and shop windows provide interesting reflections of city life and architecture. Calm water reflects the land and sky to create a perfect mirror image, whereas a slightly disturbed surface breaks up the picture in a way that is often very attractive.

A close look at any reflective surface – the chrome on a car, cutlery, puddles or a wet pavement – can lead to new picture ideas. Mirrors in all their shapes and guises offer many possibilities. Think of the convex mirrors in shops or on sharp bends in the road, wing mirrors or rear view mirrors in cars, or mirror sunglasses. You can even take your own mirror and position it to photograph a scene without people realizing what you’re up to.

Mobile Device Assessment

Below is the Mobile Device Rubric that will be used throughout the semester:

Area of Assessment

Points

Creative & Analytical Thinking Incorporating Self Expression, Human Culture/History

  • Concepts and ideas are considered, investigated, and developed in adventurous ways resulting in surprising and unusual combinations.

  • Work has immediate impact based on concept, technique, skill, and visual presentation.

      /9

Manipulation of Materials

  • Camera functions (Exposure, Selective focus)

  • Lighting, Camera to subject distance

      /9

Problem Solving through the Elements and Principles of Art

  • Intentional use and selection of compositional devices (balance, Fill the frame, follow the eyes, framing, leading lines, lines, point of perspective, rule of thirds, symmetry and pattern)

  • Edges of picture frame considered

  • Dominant and subordinate subject features resolved

      /9

Presentation and Quality

  • Image exposure, contrast, focus to enhance attention to project theme

  • Filters and borders enhance image presentation and quality

      /9

Time Management, Process and Work Ethic

  • Meeting deadlines

  • Shows consistent concern with quality, focus and determination for developing skills from start to the finish

      /9

Overall

       /9

Project Assessment Rubric

The assessment below will be used for each of the six personal projects you create this semester:

Area of Assessment

Points

Creative & Analytical Thinking Incorporating Self Expression, Human Culture/History

  • Concepts and ideas are considered, investigated, and developed in adventurous ways resulting in surprising and unusual combinations.

  • Work challenges existing conventions to theme presented

  • Work has immediate impact based on concept, technique, skill, and visual presentation.

        /9

Manipulation of Materials

  • Camera functions (Shutter, Aperture, Exposure, Selective focus)

  • Lighting, Camera to subject distance, Lens selection/adjustment

  • Workflow integration- Image capture to Master/Project folder;Digital Contact Print;Camera RAW & Photoshop editing; Documentation in printed form and optimized for web in blog posting

       /9

Problem Solving through the Elements and Principles of Art

  • Intentional use and selection of compositional devices (balance, Fill the frame, follow the eyes, framing, leading lines, lines, point of perspective, rule of thirds, symmetry and pattern)

  • Edges of picture frame considered

  • Dominant and subordinate subject features resolved

       /9

Presentation and Quality

  • Image exposure, contrast, focus to enhance attention to project theme

  • Free from digital noise/ scratches

  • Print size / resolution consistent with media to be displayed in

  • Even borders / all images aligned and spaced proficiently / name labeled

  • Blog posting includes plan of action, digital contact print, summary, comments

        /9

Time Management, Process and Work Ethic

  • Meeting deadlines

  • Shows consistent concern with quality, focus and determination for developing skills from start to the finish

  • Uses time and space efficiently and is engaged in studio work for the whole class period

  • Demonstrates respect by being attentive during instruction, willingness to incorporate new ideas into work, and collaborate with others in meaningful ways.

        /9

Overall

       /9

9 Compositional Devices

Enclosed are  nine types of compositional devices discussed from the powerpoint presentation link. These devices provide you with ways to consider on how to compose the elements within your picture.

Below are additional examples as to how these compositional devices work within the presentation of a photographic image:

BALANCE: This can be a vertical balance (top and bottom) or horizontal balance (left to right)

FILL THE FRAME: Filling the frame with the subject

FOLLOW THE EYES: This can be from a person or statue

FRAMING: The use of other objects to surround the main subject

LEADING LINES: A literal or implied line is formed throughout your composition that helps the viewer move throughout your image

LINES: The use of diagonals, horizontal, vertical, or curved lines that dominate the image to harmonize with the main subject

POINT OF PERSPECTIVE: The vantage point the viewer takes on can be either high or low

RULE OF THIRDS: By aligning the main subject onto the thirds of your picture either vertically or horizontally forces you to take the main subject away from the corners and center

SYMMETRY AND PATTERN: By finding repeating structures or patterns within your image and harmonizing it with the main subject, or making it your main subject

Documentation of Project Work

As you develop your ideas and directions to take in each of your personal projects, you will need to provide the following in the form of a single blog post to be added as you complete each project.

PLAN OF ACTION – TO BE COMPLETED THE FIRST WEEK OF THE PROJECT

Each plan of action should include:

  • Project title
  • An explanation to the theme of your project (the concept/big ideas)
  • A minimum of three visual resources of inspiration (cited)
  • Steps taken to complete this project (specific equipment, locations, models, props, lighting, compositional devices, ect…)

This plan of action is a required starting point in sharing your vision with the rest of the class. This gives everyone the opportunity to provide insightful feedback and further direction as the project evolves.

DIGITAL CONTACT PRINT – TO BE COMPLETED BEFORE EDITING TAKES PLACE

  • Provide a contact print of pictures taken for your project
  • Depending on the number of images completed for the series of work, 20 to 25 images is a good number
  • Provide some comments to which images look to be favorites for final editing
  • Click here to view how to create a digital contact print

COMPLETED SERIES OF WORK – TO BE COMPLETED AT THE END OF THE PROJECT

  • Post saved for web images of each of the final images in your project
  • Click here to view how to save for web
  • Provide a summary of what you learned and insights to your process