Tag Archives: texture

Texture

-INTRODUCTION TO TEXTURE 

TEXTURE IS SEEN BY ARTISTS AS BEING A USEFUL TECHNIQUE IN DESCRIBING THE CHARACTER OF THE OBJECT BEING DRAWN OR PAINTED. TEXTURE VISUALLY STIMULATES OUR TACTILE RESPONSES SO THAT WE SENSE THE SURFACE QUALITY OF THE DRAWN OBJECT. TEXTURE ALSO HELPS TO VISUALLY ENRICH THE PICTORIAL AREAS OF PAINTINGS WITH FINE DETAILS. TEXTURE HELPS US TO BELIEVE THAT THE PAINTED SHAPE IS REALLY A THREE-DIMENSIONAL OBJECT THAT MAY SEEM CLOSER TO THE VIEWER THAN ANOTHER OBJECT HAVING LESS TEXTURE. FINALLY, TEXTURE IS USED BY PAINTERS TO CONTROL THE OVERALL PATTERNS THAT OBJECTS NATURALLY HAVE SO THAT THE PICTURE DOESN’T BECOME TO VISUALLY DISTRACTING.

-SIMULATED TEXTURE-

SIMULATED TEXTURES ARE VERY COMMON IN THE FIELD OF ART. SUCH TEXTURES CALL FOR CAREFUL RENDERING OR COPYING OF THE LIGHT AND DARK PATTERNS CREATED BY THE SURFACE CHARACTER. THE DUTCH AND FLEMISH PAINTERS OF THE 16TH CENTURY PRODUCED AMAZINGLY NATURALISTIC EFFECTS IN STILL-LIFE PAINTINGS. THEIR PAINTINGS SIMULATED TEXTURE IN SUCH DETAIL, THEY WERE ABLE TO FOOL THE EYE INTO THINKING THE OBJECTS WERE REAL.

A SIMULATED TEXTURE IS BASICALLY A PATTERN AND IS TEXTURAL ONLY TO THE DEGREE THAT IT REMINDS ONE OF THE SENSE OF TOUCH.

-ACTUAL TEXTURE-

IF THE ARTIST CHOOSES TO ATTACH REAL MATERIALS TO THE PICTURE, ACTUAL TEXTURE IS BEING USED. THE VIEWER CAN ACTUALLY TOUCH THE MATERIAL. THIS HAPPENS WHEN THE ARTIST IS PRIMARILY CONCERNED WITH PRESENTING THE PICTURE AS A TANGIBLE OBJECT AND NOT AS AN ILLUSION OF NATURE.

EARLY IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY, A GROUNP OF PAINTERS CALLED CUBISTS, EXPERIMENTED WITH MANY TEXTURES. THEY PASTED BITS OF NEWSPAPER, STAMPS, AND TICKETS DIRECTLY ON THE PICTURE SURFACE. THE PRINTED AND CUT PASSAGES OF THESE PIECES CREATED PATTERNS.THIS TECHNIQUE IS CALLED PAPIER COLLE. EVENTUALLY, PAPIER COLLE INCLUDED BITS OF WISE, WOOD, SANDPAPER, AND OTHER ACTUAL TEXTURES. COLLAGES ARE PICTURES MADE UP OF SCRAPS OF THIS KIND. THE ARTIST MAY ALSO INCLUDE DRAWN AND PAINTED AREAS WITH THE ACTUAL TEXTURES.

SOME ARTISTS, LIKE VINCENT VAN GOGH, PRODUCED TEXTURES IN THEIR PAINTINGS BY BUILDING UP THE PIGMENT ON THE CANVAS. THE IRREGULAR SURFACE OF THE PAINT ITSELF HELPS TO REFLECT LIGHT AND EMPHASIZE THE TEXTURE OF THE OBJECT PAINTED.

-INVENTED TEXTURES

INVENTED TEXTURES MAY HAVE THEIR SOURCE IN NATURE, BUT THEY UNDERGO A GREAT CHANGE WHEN THE ARTIST CREATES A TEXTURE FOR A PICTURE. THE INVENTED TEXTURE IS REALLY A DECORATIVE PATTERN. LINES OR SHAPES ARE REPEATED ON A SMALL SCALE OVER THE SURFACE OF THE OBJECT.

IF THE PICTURE IS NONREPRESENTATIONAL, THAT IS, IS NOT PORTRAYING REAL OBJECTS, THE INVENTED TEXTURE USUALLY BECOMES OF GEOMETRIC PATTERN. HOWEVER, ALL TEXTURES, INVENTED OR SIMULATED, MUST MAKE THE VIEWER HAVE THE FEELING THAT THE OBJECT OF NONREPRESENTATIONAL SHAPE CAN BE TOUCHED AND ITS TEXTURE FELT.

-TEXTURE USED WITH IN PATTERN

WHEN GROUPS OF LINES ARE COMBINED TO PRODUCE A FLAT OR TWO-DIMENSIONAL EFFECT, A PATTERN RESULTS. IF, HOWEVER, THE RESULT ISONE WHICH STIMULATES OUR SENSATION OF TOUCH BY SUGGESTING DEGREES OF ROUGHNESS OR SMOOTHNESS, THE EFFECT MAY BE TERMED TEXTURE.

THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN PATTERN AND TEXTURE IS THAT PATTERN IS ONLY A DECORATIVE DESIGN INVOLVING SOME REPITION OF SHAPES THAT MAY OR MAY NOT BE BASED ON NATURE. TEXTURE, HOWEVER, IS A PATTERN THAT ALSO MAKES THE VIEWER HAVE A TACTILE RESPONSE.

-TEXTURE VARIATION

ACTUAL, SIMULATED, OR INVENTED TEXTURES VARY AS TO THE DEGREES OF SMOOTH OR ROUGH, PLAIN OR DECORATED SURFACE QUALITY.TEXTURE VARIATION IS AFFECTED BY THE CHARACTER OF VARIOUS MEDIA AND TOOLS. THE ARTIST SELECTS TOOLS CAREFULLY BECAUSE THE TOOL ITSELF WILL DETERMINE THE TYPE OF SURFACE QUALITY THAT CAN BE PRODUCED. FOR EXAMPLE, BRUSHES OF A HARD BRISTLE CAN MAKE SHARP OR ROUGH LINES. BRUSHES WITH SOFT HAIRS CAN PRODUCE SMOOTH LINES IF LOADED WITH THIN PAINT AND THICK, BLOTTED LINES IF LOADED WITH HEAVY PAINT. THE TEXTURE VARIATION OF PENCIL DRAWINGS CAN BE PRODUCED DEPENDING ON HAND PRESSURE, AS WELL AS THE TYPE OF LINE DRAWN.

35mm Texture Project

Both the natural and the man-made world are alive with the most amazing diversity of textures for you to explore. Textures are mostly composed of raised surfaces that catch the light, making a pattern of light and shadow. By taking the time in recognizing the full range of textures within the details of forms, you will find yourself consciously composing to include texture to add interest and expression to your photographs.

This 35mm film project consists of textures as the focus within the series of work. First, review the document referencing TEXTURE.

Before you begin taking pictures that capture texture, I would like you to better prepare yourself by doing a bit of research. I would like for you to complete the following as a blog post:

  • Provide three examples visual inspiration that incorporates texture as a main component within the work (be sure to cite your sources)
  • Include a plan of action to include potential locations to shoot, compositional devices, and the types of textures you want to capture

To help you along the way, included are some examples of textures from different photographers. This is only a starting point to help you start to identify the various directions you can go in capturing textures and you are not limited to these examples:

peter-ainsworth,

new-yorks-forgotten-island

chernobyl-25-years-later

lalla-essaydis-harem-girls

lori-nix

ruins-of-detroit

manufactured-totems

aerial-views-of-the-oil-spill

a-digital-wasteland-in-africas-agbogbloshie-market

sea-change-photographers-respond-to-the-bp-oil-spill

new-york-city-as-an-avatar

Included are examples of previous students research on this project compositional device examples and student texture examples below:

From these three types of texture; harmoniously organized, harmoniously disorganized, purely chaotic you may find yourself gravitating towards one type of texture or may want to try and explore all three types.

One thing to note with textures as the main subject of your image is to be conscious of finding a focal point in the picture plane. Suggestions to create a focal point are to isolate part of a texture with other textures,provide a empty space for the eye to rest, or highlights and shadows break up the texture in the picture. When in doubt, get in close to the texture and shoot a close-up and fill the frame.

 

Texture

Visual texture can be made up of anything that densely fills all or part of an image. Visual texture usually has no center of attention.

Keep your eyes open to these three kinds of visual texture:

Harmoniously organized– a close-up shot of a canvas bag’s weaves, for example.

Harmoniously disorganized- such as the blades of grass in a lawn.

Purely chaotic- a rubbish heap, a pile of laundry, certain people’s closets…

Visual texture can be featured as a stand alone image. It can also be used as a backdrop for other elements.

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Underwater Life

Goal: To help students observe texture, color, and shape of underwater life and recreate this reality by rubbing on different textured materials.

Objectives: The students learn how to use the collage medium to create multiples of a form; how to create the illusion of space by over­lapping; how to create a composition of an underwater scene by combining drawing, rubbings, and paper cut outs.

Materials: Photographs of underwater scenes and marine life, oil pastels, fadeless construc­tion paper, scissors, glue, and textured fabrics, boards, and plastics for rubbing

Time: Three to four fifty-minute periods

Procedure: The students create an underwa­ter scene by rubbing different textured mate­rials to capture the feeling of the coral, rocks, and underwater plant and animal life. These texture rubbings, done on bright colored con­struction paper, are used to cut out multiples of fish, seaweed, and other underwater life forms. The plants and animals are arranged and glued onto a blue construction paper background. The scenes are framed with black paper cut in the shape of an underwater cave.